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The National Security Agency headquarters in Maryland. For nearly three weeks, Baltimore has struggled with a cyberattack by digital extortionists that has frozen thousands of computers, shut down email and disrupted real estate sales, water bills, health alerts and many other services. But over the past year, the cyberweapon has boomeranged back and is now showing up in the N. The Allentown attack, in February last year, disrupted city services for weeks and cost about

The National Security Agency headquarters in Maryland. For nearly three weeks, Baltimore has struggled with a cyberattack by digital extortionists that has frozen thousands of computers, shut down email and disrupted real estate sales, water bills, health alerts and many other services. But over the past year, the cyberweapon has boomeranged back and is now showing up in the N. The Allentown attack, in February last year, disrupted city services for weeks and cost about $1 million to remedy — plus another $420,000 a year for new defenses, said Matthew Leibert, the city’s chief information officer. A recent attack took place in Baltimore, the agency’s own backyard. lost control of the tool, Eternal Blue, it has been picked up by state hackers in North Korea, Russia and, more recently, China, to cut a path of destruction around the world, leaving billions of dollars in damage. The costs can be hard for local governments to bear. official likened the situation to a government failing to lock up a warehouse of automatic weapons. Next was Russia, which used the weapon in an attack — called Not Petya — that was aimed at Ukraine but spread across major companies doing business in the country. Since that leak, foreign intelligence agencies and rogue actors have used Eternal Blue to spread malware that has paralyzed hospitals, airports, rail and shipping operators, A. Before it leaked, Eternal Blue was one of the most useful exploits in the N. North Korea was the first nation to co-opt the tool, for an attack in 2017 — called Wanna Cry — that paralyzed the British health care system, German railroads and some 200,000 organizations around the world.“There are warehouses of kids overseas firing off phishing emails,” Mr. Leibert said, like thugs shooting military-grade weapons at random targets. Andrew Hutton, a software engineer at NSA, started working at the Agency as an intern while at UTSA, a school he said he chose for its cybersecurity program.“I showed up and was working on code and pushing it to production right away,” he said of his internship.

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The National Security Agency headquarters in Maryland. For nearly three weeks, Baltimore has struggled with a cyberattack by digital extortionists that has frozen thousands of computers, shut down email and disrupted real estate sales, water bills, health alerts and many other services. But over the past year, the cyberweapon has boomeranged back and is now showing up in the N. The Allentown attack, in February last year, disrupted city services for weeks and cost about $1 million to remedy — plus another $420,000 a year for new defenses, said Matthew Leibert, the city’s chief information officer.

A recent attack took place in Baltimore, the agency’s own backyard. lost control of the tool, Eternal Blue, it has been picked up by state hackers in North Korea, Russia and, more recently, China, to cut a path of destruction around the world, leaving billions of dollars in damage. The costs can be hard for local governments to bear. official likened the situation to a government failing to lock up a warehouse of automatic weapons.

Next was Russia, which used the weapon in an attack — called Not Petya — that was aimed at Ukraine but spread across major companies doing business in the country.

Since that leak, foreign intelligence agencies and rogue actors have used Eternal Blue to spread malware that has paralyzed hospitals, airports, rail and shipping operators, A. Before it leaked, Eternal Blue was one of the most useful exploits in the N. North Korea was the first nation to co-opt the tool, for an attack in 2017 — called Wanna Cry — that paralyzed the British health care system, German railroads and some 200,000 organizations around the world.

“There are warehouses of kids overseas firing off phishing emails,” Mr.

million to remedy — plus another 0,000 a year for new defenses, said Matthew Leibert, the city’s chief information officer.

A recent attack took place in Baltimore, the agency’s own backyard. lost control of the tool, Eternal Blue, it has been picked up by state hackers in North Korea, Russia and, more recently, China, to cut a path of destruction around the world, leaving billions of dollars in damage. The costs can be hard for local governments to bear. official likened the situation to a government failing to lock up a warehouse of automatic weapons.

Next was Russia, which used the weapon in an attack — called Not Petya — that was aimed at Ukraine but spread across major companies doing business in the country.

Since that leak, foreign intelligence agencies and rogue actors have used Eternal Blue to spread malware that has paralyzed hospitals, airports, rail and shipping operators, A. Before it leaked, Eternal Blue was one of the most useful exploits in the N. North Korea was the first nation to co-opt the tool, for an attack in 2017 — called Wanna Cry — that paralyzed the British health care system, German railroads and some 200,000 organizations around the world.

“There are warehouses of kids overseas firing off phishing emails,” Mr.

With nearly a dozen research projects to choose from, students are learning new ways in which to think, design and create to tackle real world challenges, in particular as it relates to cyber and national security.” NSA has established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the University of Texas (UT) System, which enables easy collaboration between NSA and any of the 14 schools in the UT System.

The malware that hit San Antonio last September infected a computer inside Bexar County sheriff’s office and tried to spread across the network using Eternal Blue, according to two people briefed on the attack. and Homeland Security officials, speaking privately, said more accountability at the N.

This past week, researchers at the security firm Palo Alto Networks discovered that a Chinese state group, Emissary Panda, had hacked into Middle Eastern governments using Eternal Blue.“You can’t hope that once the initial wave of attacks is over, it will go away,” said Jen Miller-Osborn, a deputy director of threat intelligence at Palo Alto Networks. officials used the term “NOBUS,” for “nobody but us,” for vulnerabilities only the agency had the sophistication to exploit.

cyberweapon, Eternal Blue, has caused billions of dollars in damage worldwide. Security experts say Eternal Blue attacks have reached a high, and cybercriminals are zeroing in on vulnerable American towns and cities, from Pennsylvania to Texas, paralyzing local governments and driving up costs. Thomas Rid, a cybersecurity expert at Johns Hopkins University, called the Shadow Brokers episode “the most destructive and costly N. Amit Serper, head of security research at Cybereason, said his firm had responded to Eternal Blue attacks at three different American universities, and found vulnerable servers in major cities like Dallas, Los Angeles and New York.

But here is what frustrated city employees and residents do not know: A key component of the malware that cybercriminals used in the attack was developed at taxpayer expense a short drive down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway at the National Security Agency, according to security experts briefed on the case. He described the package of dangerous computer code that hit Allentown as “commodity malware,” sold on the dark web and used by criminals who don’t have specific targets in mind.

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